What I’m Thankful for as an Inner-City Teacher

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By Andrew Pillow

People do a lot of complaining about how hard and thankless it is to be an inner-city teacher. To be completely honest, we have done our fair share of complaining about it on this very blog. It is easy to get into a deficit based mindset when teaching where we do. 


Under-funded, under-staffed, under-resourced, and underpaid work environments don’t exactly inspire a ton of things to be thankful for, but that doesn’t mean we don’t have anything to give thanks for. Today, I am going to take note and list all of the things that I am thankful for as an inner-city teacher. 


1.    The resiliency of my students

My students face obstacles in and out of the classroom. I’m not going to perpetuate the stereotype that every inner-city student is at-risk. However, some of my students are, and they face tremendous odds every day. I’m thankful that most of my students arrive in my classroom everyday receptive and ready to learn. 

2.    The drive of my co-workers

Because of the underpaid and thankless nature of the work we do, I can be pretty sure that most of the teachers I work with are there for the right reasons. Everyone I work with could leave for an easier environment and higher pay. Not all my co-workers are world-class teachers, but they are all committed to the betterment of our students, and that’s something to be thankful for.  

3.    The optimism of our students’ parents

Again, not all of our students come from poor or underprivileged families, but some of them do. Of the ones who do, I am always impressed by the ability of the families to hope and dream of a life for their children beyond the scope of what they have experienced themselves. For a single mother who has never gone to college to aspire for her son to be a doctor or lawyer is more than admirable; it's heroic.

4.    The leadership of my administration

If you get a bunch of teachers around each other it typically doesn’t take long for the conversation to shift to complaints about admin and principals. Luckily, this is not really a problem for me. My administration is not only on board with the mission but also the way in which each individual teacher goes about achieving it. Given all the other schools that I could have landed at, and the testimony of my fellow teachers from different schools, I consider myself lucky to be at a school where my superiors are invested and respect each individual teacher.

It has become almost chic to make fun of inner city teaching environments. However, let's make sure that we as teachers are keeping track of the minor blessings and miracles that take place every day. 
 

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Andrew Pillow

Andrew is a technology teacher at KIPP Indy College Prep. He is graduate of the University of Kentucky and a Teach for America Alum. Andrew just recently finished his commitment as a Teach Plus Policy fellow, and he is looking forward to putting the skills he's learned to good use. Andrew has written for several publications in the past on a wide variety of topics but will be sticking to education for his role on Indy/Ed.

4 New Jobs Teachers Should Be Exposing Students To in 2017

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By Andrew Pillow

We all remember career day at school. Community members from various occupations came to school and lectured you about their jobs. There was typically a doctor, lawyer, police officer, and if you were really lucky you got a fireman.

This is all well and good; however, it is important to realize the landscape of the workforce has changed and unfortunately, the traditional career day format hasn’t kept pace. There are tons of new occupations that you will more than likely not see represented in a career day presentation.

Here are the new jobs and industries that we should be exposing students to in 2017:

1.       Blogger

I went to school to be a print journalist. It was an invaluable experience, but what would have really served me well in today’s world is a few classes on blogging. Newspapers are dying and they are being replaced by internet writers. Some of the skills crossover, but it's not exactly the same. Teachers would be wise to cultivate their writing inclined students’ “internet writing skills”.

2.       App developer

The ubiquity of smartphones has changed the landscape of programming. Aside from the fact that a hit app can make someone rich overnight, the nature of the business encourages people to explore and cater to their own interests, communities, and niches. Meaning, a developer from an inner-city background might have unique insight and opportunity to make an app that someone else couldn’t. This is a huge advantage over other well-established fields. Not only are there jobs in this field but it’s still new enough to have a wealth of untapped ideas. Teachers shouldn’t let their kids miss out on this dot-com boom.

3.       YouTube content creator

This is probably the job your students are most familiar with already. Most of your students probably already have a favorite “YouTuber” by middle school. It sounds like fun and games but YouTuber’s regularly pull-down thousands even millions of dollars a year. Just like app developing, it’s a profession in which students can explore their own interests. We often tell people to make their hobby their profession; YouTube makes that idea possible.

4.       Social Media Manager

It may be annoying how much time generation-z spends on their phone, but there is potential to make a career out of it. Millions of “baby-boomers” and “Gen-Xers” still can’t use social media properly. As long as that is the case, they will be hiring people who can. Make sure your students know that social media is a huge priority for most businesses these days and if they are that socially inclined, maybe they should go to college for communications with a social media emphasis.

This probably won’t be the last time this list needs to be updated. As teachers, we should keep our ear to the ground for new opportunities and career paths for our students.  

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Andrew Pillow

Andrew is a technology teacher at KIPP Indy College Prep. He is graduate of the University of Kentucky and a Teach for America Alum. Andrew just recently finished his commitment as a Teach Plus Policy fellow, and he is looking forward to putting the skills he's learned to good use. Andrew has written for several publications in the past on a wide variety of topics but will be sticking to education for his role on Indy/Ed.

Vanguard Collegiate: A New Middle School Coming to Indy’s West Side

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Robert Marshall, Vanguard Collegiate Execute Director

Robert Marshall, Vanguard Collegiate Execute Director

Indianapolis native Robert Marshall dreamed of filling a void on Indy’s west side.  Through the Building Excellent Schools fellowship, his dream will become reality next school year.  Vanguard Collegiate of Indianapolis will be located in Haughville on Indy’s west side serving grades 5-8 during the 2018-19 school year.  On November 13, 2017, the Indiana Charter School Board approved Vanguard’s charter application and on November 20, 2017, Mr. Marshall was officially voted in as Executive Director of the school.

Marshall chose to bring a new school to the Haughville area (46222 zip code) because of the academic struggles of children in the area, in particular black, latino and impoverished students.

  • 10% of the population have a bachelor’s degree or higher

  • 63% have a high school diploma

  • 17% are unemployed

  • Average household income is $25,000

  • Of the eight schools in 46222, there are three charter schools. In 2015, all eight schools earned low scores on the I-STEP exam, with a 52% passage rate being the highest.

  • Three schools are K-8; however, there are no stand-alone middle schools.

He believes Vanguard will help close the academic gap and provide a high quality choice for residents.  Although Vanguard is still in negotiations concerning their location, they already have families who have completed intent to enroll forms.  Vanguard also plans to participate in Enroll Indy, an online application for families to find the best fit school for their children.  Since its charter was approved days before Enroll Indy launched on November 15, they were not able to participate in the first round.  They plan to be listed as an option in subsequent enrollment rounds.

Below is an overview of the school.

Vision/Mission:

Unapologetically focused on the academic success of our students, Vanguard Collegiate of Indianapolis educates 5-8 graders through high-quality instruction, rigorous curriculum, and character development to succeed in college and become leaders in thought, word, and action.

Values:

THINK: team, hard work, initiative, nobility, and knowledge.

Academic Program

  • Extended school day 8:00-4:30; 185 days

  • 160 minutes of literacy and 110 minutes math daily

  • Co-curricular opportunities:  Fine Arts, IT, Critical Thinking/Service Learning, Physical Education

  • Curriculum:  

    • Literacy - Engage NY, Achieve 3000, Fountas & Pinnell

    • Math - Engage NY

    • Science - Physical science, Life Science, Engineering & Technology

    • Social Studies - US History, World History, US Government

  • Supports

    • Character education

    • Response to Intervention

    • Sheltered English Immersion Model

    • Mental health through community partners

Assessments for Accountability

  • ISTEP (ILEARN), NWEA MAP, WIDA ACCESS

  • Teacher created assessments & interim assessments

  • Parent and staff satisfaction survey

Staff

  • Need six teachers for year one; three of six teachers have been identified.

  • Highly qualified diverse staff is important.

    • Two identified teachers are African American males

    • One identified teacher is an African American female

    • One teacher was teacher of the year in Washington Township

    • One teacher has a PhD in Curriculum and Instruction

  • Would like to find a highly qualified Latino candidate.

  • One staff spot is being reserved for a Teacher for America candidate.

Start-up funds

Vanguard Collegiate’s next board meeting will be held on Monday, December 11 at 6 p.m. at the Christamore House at 502 N. Tremont Street, Indianapolis, IN 46222.

Click here to review Vanguard’s Charter Application or check out their website for more information.

Tell Your Students the Truth About Thanksgiving

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By Andrew Pillow

Thanksgiving break is coming up. Many teachers use this time to give students a bunch of fluff assignments. However, some teachers do actually try and incorporate some content among the hand turkeys and pilgrim coloring books. This content typically includes the normal “Thanksgiving narrative”:

The pilgrims were having a hard time. The natives helped. They celebrated. They lived happily ever-after. The end.

Don’t teach your students about the “Happily-Ever-After Thanksgiving”. Your students need to know the truth about the relationship between the Pilgrims and Natives.

There are plenty of resources available to help you plan a historically accurate lesson. However, if you are not in the mood to do any research or look for yourself here is the gist:

The Pilgrims and the Natives were not friends

The most endearing image of Thanksgiving is a nice pretty scene of Natives and Pilgrims gathering in a village and mingling as if they were old friends. This likely is not how either side would have described their interactions back then.  They were not old buddies. Actually they weren't even actually invited to the Thanksgiving celebration. The relationship was mutually beneficial. While there were undoubtedly some friendships among the groups, people shouldn’t mistake a tenuous truce as a true friendship. As a matter of fact, by the colonist’s own accounts they stole from the natives and in some cases even dug up their dead. And these are the things they did to the Wampanoag, the tribe that they were allegedly friends with.

Other tribes like the Pequot had a much worse experience. Which brings me to the second point.

Thanksgiving has at-least some connection to a massacre

We know that the Pilgrims celebrated “the first Thanksgiving” in 1621, but it remains a topic of hot debate how the annual tradition came about. Some historians contend that the actual annual Thanksgiving holiday came on the heels of a massacre.

In 1636 a murdered settler led to the blaming and subsequent massacre of a Pequot village. Men, women, and children were killed in some the most horrific ways possible. After this “victory”, William Bradford the Governor of Plymouth proclaimed that day to be a day of “Thanks giving” and “For the next 100 years, every Thanksgiving Day ordained by a Governor was in honor of the bloody victory, thanking God that the battle had been won.”

The relationship between the Pilgrims and Wampanoag deteriorated

Massasoit was the leader or Sachem of the Wampanoag that brokered the peace and the treaties with Pilgrims. By the time is son took over that role, relationships with the Pilgrims had deteriorated to the point where war was on the horizon.

The war concluded with Massasoit’s son’s head being displayed as a “warning” for years after in Plymouth.  

 

Telling your students the truth doesn’t mean you have to ignore the “positive” message of the Thanksgiving holiday. But as teachers we owe it to our students to give them accurate information.

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Andrew Pillow

Andrew is a technology teacher at KIPP Indy College Prep. He is graduate of the University of Kentucky and a Teach for America Alum. Andrew just recently finished his commitment as a Teach Plus Policy fellow, and he is looking forward to putting the skills he's learned to good use. Andrew has written for several publications in the past on a wide variety of topics but will be sticking to education for his role on Indy/Ed.

Five ways teachers can improve their relationships with their students’ parents

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It doesn’t matter if you are in your first year as a teacher or your twentieth year of teaching; there is nothing more important than the relationship with your students’ parents. Having a good relationship with parents is essential to ensuring students are receiving the best education. Throughout the long school year, there will be times when the parent and the teacher are not always on the same page, but that does not mean they cannot work together. Here are five ways teachers can improve the relationship:

1. Begin early

The first two weeks of the school year are essential to the relationship between teachers and parents. The beginning of the school year is a great time to start the relationship on the right foot. As a teacher, it is important to make that initial contact to start the relationship. During that initial conversation, it is best practice for the teacher to ask questions about the student. This shows parents the teacher values their opinion and wants expert advice on how best to educate their child(ren). Many parents may feel intimated by the school setting, but if the teacher makes early contact, it will ease some of the worry about the school.

2. Encourage the parental involvement

A parent’s contribution to the school community is huge. Many parents have unique skills that can be used to support the school community. Parents are great volunteers on field trips or school events. Parents also are great at creating and spearheading programs within the school. As a teacher, it is important when you speak to parents to listen closely.  During those conversations, you not only learn about the student, but you also learn about the parents. During the conversation your parents may come up with ideas that can benefit you as a teacher.

3. Communicate often and vary the communication

As a teacher, it is important that after making initial contact that you continue the contact. Parent contact is not always about calling them on the phone. Make an effort that if parents pick their child up, you stop and have a conversation face to face. One of the best ways to build that relationship is to communicate weekly in a newsletter. Parents will appreciate when they are kept informed about what is going on in the classroom and in the school.

4. Give positive reports

No parent wants always wants to hear how their student is not doing well. The quickest way to become isolated from your students’ parents is to be the teacher that always calls when the student is in trouble. I am not saying you should not call when the student is in trouble, but be sure to mix in some positive reports in those communications. Parents need to know that when the teacher calls it can be either positive or negative.

5. Smile

There is nothing more contagious and welcoming than a smile. If you truly want to create a great relationship and partnership with your students’ parents just simply smile when you see them. That smile from the teacher to the parent can be all that’s needed to have a great relationship.

 

Comment

David McGuire

Mr. McGuire is a middle school teacher in Indianapolis, Teach Plus Policy Fellow, and currently enrolled in a doctoral program at Indiana State University for Educational Leadership. Driven by the lack of having an African American male teacher in his classrooms growing up, David helped launched the Educate ME Foundation, which is geared towards increasing the number of African American male teachers in the classroom. A born and raised Hoosier, he is dedicated to improving educational outcomes for all students in Indianapolis. He describes his educational beliefs as a reformer grounded in the best practices of traditional public schools, where he was mentored by strong leaders. David graduated from Central State University with a degree in English and also holds an MBA from Indiana Wesleyan University.

Weekend Links (11/19/17)

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Andrew Pillow

Andrew is a technology teacher at KIPP Indy College Prep. He is graduate of the University of Kentucky and a Teach for America Alum. Andrew just recently finished his commitment as a Teach Plus Policy fellow, and he is looking forward to putting the skills he's learned to good use. Andrew has written for several publications in the past on a wide variety of topics but will be sticking to education for his role on Indy/Ed.

Reminder: All Students Don’t Have the Same Holiday and Break Experience

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By Andrew Pillow

We are coming up on the holiday season. This is a favorite time for teachers and students. Students are excited to be away from school; teachers are excited to be away from students. Overall the holidays tend to be a rather joyful time in schools, and while this is definitely positive, it can also lead to assumptions and uncomfortable moments for kids.

The natural tendency of teachers before or shortly after a holiday break is to assign a bunch of “fluff assignments” about holidays and traditions.

“What are you getting for Christmas?”

“Where are you going over spring break?”

“What did you do over summer break?”

“What family member are you most excited to see over Thanksgiving?”

None of these questions are bad to ask in a vacuum, but in a school with underprivileged students, this can create an environment of haves and have-nots due to the fact the children have vastly different experiences over holidays and breaks.

1.       Every student does not celebrate the same holidays.

I think in 2017 most teachers are aware of this… however I still see drawings of Santa Claus and Rudolph every time I walk into a school during December. It’s important to be sensitive to your students who don’t celebrate popular holidays. Also be aware of the fact that even if students do celebrate a certain a holiday, that doesn’t mean they celebrate it the way you think they do. For example, many students and their families don’t subscribe to the secular version of Christmas. It’s okay to teach your students about holidays but don’t have activities that essentially mandate celebrating them.

2.       Not every student has a dream vacation over the break.

If you teach at a school similar to mine, then you know holidays and breaks may not be something your students want to write about. Not all of your students are going to be fortunate enough to take extravagant trips to Florida over spring break. And the last thing a poor student wants is to be regaled with tales of Disney World and Universal Studios because of your “Where did you go over spring break assignment?”

3.       All your students don’t get a ton of presents.

All three Abrahamic religions have some gift giving tradition. That doesn’t mean you should put students on the spot about what gifts they received when they come back from break. Some students are going to get a whole lot of presents over the holidays. Some will not. Don’t put your other students in a position where they fill like they have to lie about what they got in order to feel adequate around their classmates by assigning some stupid and unnecessary, “What did you get for Christmas writing prompt?”

Teachers often feel the overwhelming urge to deviate away from content during the days leading up to holidays and breaks. But if teachers can’t come up with something that allows everyone to be included without feeling inadequate, they are probably better off sticking to the standards.  

Comment

Andrew Pillow

Andrew is a technology teacher at KIPP Indy College Prep. He is graduate of the University of Kentucky and a Teach for America Alum. Andrew just recently finished his commitment as a Teach Plus Policy fellow, and he is looking forward to putting the skills he's learned to good use. Andrew has written for several publications in the past on a wide variety of topics but will be sticking to education for his role on Indy/Ed.

Teachers, It Isn’t Your Job to Judge Parents

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The emotionally moving show This Is Us is currently airing its second season.  Episode seven, “The Most Disappointed Man” made me think about how quickly and how easily we judge people who aren’t living up to certain expectations.  During this episode, viewers learn more about the life of Randall’s father after he left him at a fire station.

 

Judge - You have no record, not so much as a traffic violation so I must admit I find this arrest rather disappointing.

 

William - What would you have me do, Your Honor?  On every corner, there’s someone selling, so I buy and I use. If you had my life, you’d probably use too. Just a year ago, my mother was alive and my girl was alive and we were having a son.  Now they’re gone.  They’re all gone.

 

Judge - (interrupts) Mr. Hill

 

William - So I come here and you tell me you’re disappointed.  Well guess what?  I am more disappointed.  I am the most disappointed man you’ve ever met in your whole damn life.  So if you want to lock me up, lock me up.  Put me inside because there is nothing out here for me anymore.

 

After viewing this scene, I immediately thought about how school staff sometimes treat parents.  We judge some of our most vulnerable families because of choices they have made in the past or choices they are working through today.  Instead of showing empathy, we share our disappointment with the child or with the parents.  We lecture them about what they should do and sometimes even tell them how to do it.  “If you would only read with your child, every night then he would meet grade level benchmarks.”  Many educators don’t have the same life experiences as the families they serve.  They haven’t had to chose between buying groceries or paying their utility bills.  They haven’t had to hope their children will be okay with the cheapest child care service they can find while they are working a second job.  It’s easy to chastise, but what we really should do is connect families to supports and resources that will help.  When wrap-around services are working effectively, both parents and teachers get what they want, a successful student with unlimited potential.

 

If you were wondering, the words William shared did strike a chord with the judge.  

 

Judge - I gave a young man ten years today, younger than you.  He stole a TV; ten years for stealing a TV, wasn’t even a good TV.  I didn’t want to do it. Just like I didn’t want to give five years to a different fellow yesterday, 15 years to another guy the day before that.  I’m a judge and the strange thing is I don’t make the rules, so round and round it goes.  I know the ending to each one of those stories.  They haven’t even been written yet.  I’m here, Mr. Hill, because you said something yesterday and it stuck with me.  You said you were the most disappointed man in the world and I’m here to tell you I fear I am close second Mr. Hill because I’m the man who writes terrible stories day after day and I can’t change the endings and that sir is a horrible disappointment so I want to see if we can find a different ending here.  I’m going to take a chance on you get you out, get you help.  I don’t expect you to be perfect and I know you’ll make mistakes like the rest of us.

 

Educators need to be more like this judge and have a change of heart.  We need to help families have a different ending to their stories.  Many families we are disappointed in are in survival mode.  We have the power to break the survival mode cycle.  We should work with parents as partners to help their children become academic success stories, so they can grow up to have a life where they are thriving and not just surviving.

 

 

A Conversation with David Osborne

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“I believe every family should have a choice in selecting a school. It is then up to schools to create the options.” David Osborne

Last night, I had the privilege to attend an event co-hosted by the Mind Trust and Progressive Policy Institute to hear David Osborne, author of the best-selling book, Reinventing America’s Schools: Creating a 21st Century Education System. The book is about the charter school movement and he presents a theory that he believes needs to happen to fix America’s schools. This book is similar to his 1992 New York Times bestseller Reinventing Government.

In this book, Osborne uses compelling stories from cities like New Orleans and lays out the history and possible future of public education. It was in 2005, when Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans; the city got an unexpected opportunity to recreate their school system from scratch. The state's Recovery School District (RSD) was created to help turn around failing schools. What happened was all of New Orleans schools were transformed into charter schools. The results have turned the entire American education system on its head. New Orleans in the matter of ten years had tripled their effectiveness in their test scores, school performance scores, graduation and dropout rates, ACT scores, college-going rates. With the work done in New Orleans, other cities are using a similar blueprint to transform their schools. Cities such as: Newark, Camden, Memphis, Denver, Cleveland, Oakland, and even Indianapolis are transforming failing schools and giving families and children new hope for education.

Throughout the hour and half, he touched on numerous topics including answering two questions I asked him. The first question I asked was around the opening of new charter schools. Just the other day the Charter School Board approved a few brand new charters for seven years. I wanted to know if David Osborne thought the market is becoming saturated with too many schools popping up especially with the limited space? In a detailed answered he said something that struck a chord, “To do this work you must also be ok with closing schools.”  He was right you can open charter schools, but it is important that you also close schools that are underperforming. Close a bad school and open a new school. Seems easy, but it isn’t always that easy. Mr. Osborne went on to talk about the research behind the debate between taking a failing school and hiring a new principal or simply allowing another management company to take the school over. He said that his research found that allowing another management company to take the school over was more effective. He said the idea around innovation schools here in Indianapolis, which allows a charter management company to takeover a failing school will be more effective than simply just replacing the leadership in that school. He closed by saying it was up to the charter management authorizer to manage the situation between opening and closing schools. They must have their pulse on the issues in order to ensure the market does not become saturated. I just hope the authorizers in our city have a pulse.

My second question for David Osborne was if he thought the charter movement Indianapolis could move outside of IPS and impact other Indianapolis schools district such as Pike, Wayne, Warren, or Lawrence. He believes it could. “There is nothing stopping them from expanding to those schools.” The same effort and backing to convert failing schools in IPS is the same effort needed to convert schools in those districts as well.” If there is a charter school that decides to do it, they should do it.” I was really interested to get his side on this because this is something that I have been thinking about for a long time. We keep talking about this charter movement in Indianapolis and how it is similar to other cities. I always feel the need to push back because this movement seems more of a Indianapolis Public School movement not a Indianapolis movement. I say that because between Pike, Warren, Wayne, and Lawrence there are roughly 50,000 students. If the charter movement began to expand into those districts then I believe you can really say there is a charter movement in the city.

I truly enjoyed the conversation with David Osborne about his new book. I also bought a copy of the book and got it signed…

 

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I can’t wait to dive in and read it. Commentary about the book and my thoughts will be posted to the blog as soon as I finish.
 

 

Comment

David McGuire

Mr. McGuire is a middle school teacher in Indianapolis, Teach Plus Policy Fellow, and currently enrolled in a doctoral program at Indiana State University for Educational Leadership. Driven by the lack of having an African American male teacher in his classrooms growing up, David helped launched the Educate ME Foundation, which is geared towards increasing the number of African American male teachers in the classroom. A born and raised Hoosier, he is dedicated to improving educational outcomes for all students in Indianapolis. He describes his educational beliefs as a reformer grounded in the best practices of traditional public schools, where he was mentored by strong leaders. David graduated from Central State University with a degree in English and also holds an MBA from Indiana Wesleyan University.

IBE 21st Century Urban School Leadership Workshop

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The Indianapolis Chapter of the Indiana Black Expo has provided thirty-five $2500 scholarships to cover the cost for current and aspiring educators to participate in a yearlong fellowship. The fellowship includes six in person workshops with local and nationally recognized experts. The workshops will take place at Martin University on Saturdays from 9-12. The objectives of the program are:

  • Motivate administrators to understand the current climate in education, engage peers and contribute to creating quality seats in Indianapolis.

  • Link administrators and ideas across schools and districts to create powerful networks focused on making Indy a model for urban education.

  • Empower administrators to create community partnerships and understand the importance of school and community collaboration.

  • Create a diverse network that will be prepared to step in as building leaders for vacant or turnaround opportunities.

The six sessions are:

  1. Leadership:  Who You Are and Who You Want to Be. Create Your Own School Culture - facilitated by Eugene White.

  2. School Budgets and Finances - facilitated by Ken Hull

  3. The Current Landscape of Education:  Leading Tomorrow’s School - Create Your School Culture; Maintaining Environments to Achieve Success - facilitated by Deanna Cushingberry

  4. Curriculum Development - facilitated by Dr. Shawn Smith

  5. The Importance of School and Community Collaborations - facilitated by Daniel Snively

  6. Starting Your Own School - Charter/Private

This past Saturday, I had the privilege to attend the second session over school budgeting and finances. Dr. Hull led a great session that taught us as school administrators how we can better understand our budget. The fellowship was opened to 35 school administrators; however, there were only 10 that were in attendance. Despite the low attendance, the educators in attendance had an opportunity to connect and exchange numbers. Even though many of us work in different schools what connects us is our love for the students in Indianapolis. If we are going to change the landscape of Indianapolis it is important that we have spaces where we can connect and grow as professionals.


The next session will be Saturday, January 13, 2018. For more information about the 21st Century Urban School Leadership Fellowship email info@indychapter.org.

Comment

David McGuire

Mr. McGuire is a middle school teacher in Indianapolis, Teach Plus Policy Fellow, and currently enrolled in a doctoral program at Indiana State University for Educational Leadership. Driven by the lack of having an African American male teacher in his classrooms growing up, David helped launched the Educate ME Foundation, which is geared towards increasing the number of African American male teachers in the classroom. A born and raised Hoosier, he is dedicated to improving educational outcomes for all students in Indianapolis. He describes his educational beliefs as a reformer grounded in the best practices of traditional public schools, where he was mentored by strong leaders. David graduated from Central State University with a degree in English and also holds an MBA from Indiana Wesleyan University.