Title I money allocated in a way that may cause more problems

By Andrew Pillow

A program designed to reduce inequality, may actually be inequitable in and of itself.

Title I is the government’s main mechanism to close the funding gap between poor, and more affluent school districts. The program gives money to schools that serve predominantly low income families. But a new report finds that the algorithm used may actually favor certain schools over others. Specifically, the formula tends to preference larger school districts.

A brief summary of the findings via US News says:

“One of the main reasons for this is that the formula takes into consideration either the rate of poverty in a district or the number of poor students, but not both. This leads to larger school districts getting more money than smaller, often poorer districts – the opposite of what Title I was intended to do.”

Many Indianapolis Public Schools depend on Title I funding. There are many competing ideas on how to better allocate funding. We will cover those ideas in upcoming stories in the blog.

Read the report here.

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Andrew Pillow

Andrew is a technology teacher at KIPP Indy College Prep. He is graduate of the University of Kentucky and a Teach for America Alum. Andrew just recently finished his commitment as a Teach Plus Policy fellow, and he is looking forward to putting the skills he's learned to good use. Andrew has written for several publications in the past on a wide variety of topics but will be sticking to education for his role on Indy/Ed.